Friday, April 21, 2017

R is for.... get this.... Reticulum

R is a difficult one for the A-Z heavenly body challenge.  There is only one of the eighty-eight modern constellations that begins with an R, Reticulum.  To my ears, the name sounds like something a physician might utilize in a prostate exam.  Thankfully I don’t have to worry about having it staring me in the face when I am admiring the stars as the constellation cannot be seen at all from the continental United States.  You might get a glimpse of it in the southern Hawaiian Islands from October through December, but even then it’s going to be low on the southern horizon.  The constellation is not seen at all above latitude 23 degrees north. 


Like many of the southern hemisphere constellations, Reticulum is a relatively recent addition to the lists of constellations.  It was identified in the early 17th Century, but not added to the official list of constellations until 1922.  There are no stories or myths associated with these group of faint stars that supposedly represents a net.   However, it’s not a fishnet, but the gird lines within a telescope, the reticle.   And good luck with seeing this constellation, especially without a telescope.  There are only six of the stars with a magnitude bright enough to be seen by the eye without magnification, and none of them are very bright.



In 2022, the constellation will officially be 100 years old?  Shall we throw a party?  We could all dress up like urologists.  On second thought, I’m sure I have something else scheduled.  What about you?  Would you be interested in a party celebrating Reticulum’s centennial?  

17 comments:

  1. I think I will pass on the party and the thing maybe utilized in a prostate exam!

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  2. I will look for it from Ecuador, Sage. I'm afraid I am busy the night of the 2022 urology costume party. Hopefully I will have found it in the sky by then!

    Emily | My Life In Ecuador

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  3. I can’t say that I am overly familiar with how the names of stars are created, but there has to be some interesting stories there; Reticulum certainly draws to mind thoughts of things other than twinkling stars or groups of stars. In terms of how certain stars are better visible from different spots in the world, my husband and I are planning to take the boys to the Northwest Territories this summer and I am hoping for a great light show (aurora borealis).

    Thanks for visiting my blog: R for Race
    Shari

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  4. I’ll probably have to skip the 2022 urology party, but I agree that this constellation has an unfortunate name. It does sound like a medical device that’s made for private places.

    Aj @ Read All The Things!

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  5. Having cows, it does bring to mind chewing a cud... but honestly my first thought was the phrase "reticulating splines". (Simcity 2000 was THE best computer game!)

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  6. Any reason to celebrate an obscure constellation sounds like a good reason to me! I'm thinking proctologist costumes sound more appropriate, as that's where my mind went... But any "ologist" would work regardless. ;)

    A to Z 2017: Magical and Medicinal Herbs

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  7. I'm finding it very difficult to look at the word 'Reticulum' and NOT think of urology!
    Am always ready for a party under the open skies--no matter the name of the chief guest.
    R is for Rann of Kutchch

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  8. What you you give a constellation for its birthday? A gift card to The Olive Garden?

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  9. We most definitely will celebrate Reticulum's birthday. With a name like that, how could we not? :)

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  10. Happy Birthday, Reticulum! Um, that does sound kind of dirty doesn't it?

    R is for Reptilian Elite

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  11. When I was in the military and a marine would come to me with a case of retuclitis, a shot of penicillin would do the trick....

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  12. I certainly would love to see the stars in the southern hemisphere. Reticulum I won't forget! Have a good one!

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  13. Is amazing all you know about Astronomy..We have amazing skies here the last year I was in an amazing Observatory. was beautiful.

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  14. I've spent my entire life in the Northern Hemisphere. You do have some interesting constellations down there. Mensa? I collect reticulums (kidding) and maybe I'll find some nice ones "down...." no, I can't say it. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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  15. Well I'm glad you cleared up that name thing.
    And I'm only coming to the party if you let me wear my rubber gloves.
    Http://wendyoftherock.blogspot.com

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  16. Not familiar with that one. When I was a kid we came up with our own names for constellations we saw.

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  17. Will there be cake at the party? If so, count me in.

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